WIP Wednesday #5: Knife-Edged Focus

One month down, eleven to go. One novella, one short story, most of one book and the first quarter of another completed. My focus has narrowed to a knife-edge, sharpened on sentence fragments and dangling participles. I am firing on all cylinders. Migraines cluster like crows around a dying hedgehog, waiting. Always waiting.

I’m 22K into the Novel-With-No-Name. I have read some reference materials, conferred with editors, written a blurb. Characters do characterful things, in characteristic ways, moving the plot along in an efficient manner. Some books I have to sit and think about. This isn’t one of them.

I don’t know whether that’s a good thing or not. It’s just a thing. Sometimes, when I scan social media, I see other writers–writers I know–talking about their process, about the time they take to get things right, and I wonder if I’m going about things wrong. As if I’m committing some unpardonable authorial sin by not thinking more deeply about the beats of the plot, the characters…everything. Then I remember that I have a deadline, and that there are other books to write before the year is done.

Over the weekend, I made some notes for a handful of short stories. Nothing too in-depth, just some setting details and plot beats. One, I think, will be a follow-up to my story, “Mordiggian’s Due” from the 2014 anthology, Libram Mysterium. Another will possibly have something to do with the Great Fire of London.

And that’s what I’m working on this week. How about you?

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2 comments

  1. Sometimes the words flow right, sometimes they aren’t. Er. Don’t Um. Won’t?

    I find that more prep means less hassle during the typing bit, which is more productive overall. But that time could be spent on edits afterwards instead, (or not if it all turns out glossy in the end.

    1. Prep time does help with the butt-in-seat bit. This one’s more talky, less punchy-punchy-run-run, which also helps. I find dialogue easier to write, on the whole.

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